Book Review: Shrike

 

After the events of Albatross (the kidnapping, Isla's real identity, a gruesome murder— he definitely deserved it, but still) left everyone reeling, Shrike picks up right where we left off with Isla, Fritz, and Caspian struggling to find answers.
And a certain missing redhead.
The introduction of Eamon and his Arcana Militum changes everything, giving them the upper hand needed to rescue Bel.
But does he have to irritate Isla every step of the way?
Yes. Of course, he does.
Even if they manage to free Bel, the things she's seen will stay with her forever, the consequences of someone else's sins weighing her down once again.
Not only will Bel transform, both inside and out, but every one of them is irrevocably changed through the events of Shrike, for better or worse.
Try as they might, there's no back to normal for any of them. The only thing they can hold onto is that through it all, they have each other.

Shrike is book two in the Birds Of Prey Duology, a duet about unlikely heroes, misunderstood villains, and deeply flawed characters finding love in a world that seems Vankhala-bent on keeping them apart.


My Review


This book pretty much picks up after Albatross. So, you can't pick up this book without reading book one. Which, I can guarantee you that you will enjoy book one. What a shocker about Isla's identity. Yet, I am kind of now surprised as she did show herself to be a bada$$.

Caspian, Fritz, and Bel are back. Still a fan of Fritz. Not that I have anything against Caspian. I do love him and will always have a soft spot in my heart for him as he is the first one that started this journey. 

The new addition of Eamon is yummy. He kept things interesting and added another layer of hotness. Plus, I liked seeing him and Isla interacting together. There is chemistry between them. 

Albatross was hot but Shrike is next level HOT! Karlee, I was already in love with you before, but you really upped your game with this book. 

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