Tuesday, June 19, 2012

The Orphanmaster comes calling!

It is 1663 in New Amsterdam.


If you an orphan, then most likely you have met the orphanmaster. He is the one that all the children know.

Blandine van Couvering grew up an orphan herself. She has done pretty well for herself these days. Having been an orphan, Blandine has a soft spot for the other orphan children. This is why when some of the orphan children go missing, Blandine takes it upon herself to lead a group and go hunting for the missing children. Blandine is joined by Edward Drummond, a British spy. Suspicions first lead to the orphanmaster but as Blandine and Edward draw closer tothe truth, they learn there is something more evil at work.

This was quite an interesting book. Although, the first half of the book does move slowly. However, if you stick with it, it does get better. I liked the historical aspect surrounding this story, especially regarding the Native Americans and the witika. The idea that a beast could have that much power to make people turn into cannibals is creepy. Unlike some of my fellow readers, I did not have a problem with the grusome eating of human flesh. I can see though, where some could be grossed out as it was emphasized but this was to help tell the story. The whole idea of the orphanmaster had me thinking of the Pied Piper of Hamelin. The orphanmaster was in charge of all the lost children and he would lead them away.

Blandine is a strong female protagonist. She really helped lead the story. Being an orphan herself helped as she fought hard for all the missing children. While, I liked Edward too, I was not feeling so much the love interest between him and Blandine. I felt it took a bit of a side seat to the main focus of the missing children. A nicely done first novel by new author, Jean Zimmerman. The Orphanmaster comes calling!
 
Check out Jean Zimmerman's website for extra bonuses surrounding The Orphanmaster like:
 
To make a Hedge-Hog.


Take two Pounds of blanched Almonds, beat them well in a Mortar with a little Canary and Orange-flower Water-


to keep them from oiling.

· Make them into stiff Paste, then beat in the yolks of twelve Eggs, leave out five of the Whites,

· Put to it a Pint of Cream, sweeten it with Sugar, put in half a Pound of sweet Butter melted,

· Set it on a Furnace or slow Fire, and keep it constantly stirring, till it is stiff enough to be made into the Form of an Hedhe-Hog;

· Stick it full of blanched Almonds, slit and stuck up like the Bristles of a Hedge-Hog.







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